Roberto Alomar: Conditioning Your Glove

Finding a glove that best suits your needs is mostly based on how it feels to you, according to the Hall Of Famer Roberto Alomar. “My gloves usually last two to three years,” he said. “I always have a glove that I only use in games, and one that I use during batting practice that I break in to eventually use in games. The glove I’m using now is two years old. I started using it in spring training two years ago, and I’ve kept it since then.”

  •     I like my glove to be very flexible so I like soft leather.
  •     I do not like a glove with a deep pocket because when you are turning a double play, the ball can get lost in a deep pocket. I like a relatively flat, shallow glove, which allows you to find the ball quickly.
  •     Tying any of the laces that stick out from a glove makes it tighter and more rigid. Since I like my glove to be flexible, I just let the laces dangle. When I get the glove new, all the laces are tied up in knots but they eventually work themselves loose and then I just let them stay that way.
  •     My glove is pretty small, even for a middle infielder. Second basemen usually have the smallest gloves of all the fielders, and in most cases, shortstops will have slightly bigger gloves than second basemen.
  •     All of the guys in the clubhouse know that I also don’t like anyone putting their hand in my glove. It’s built for my hand, and if someone else puts their hand in it to try it on, I can usually tell, because it will feel looser on my hand when I put it back on.
  •     It’s hard to say exactly what makes a good baseball glove, but mostly it has to feel right to you.
  •     In cold weather, sometimes I will spray some stick-um on the inside of my glove to give my hand a better grip on the inside of the glove. I spray it on the outside of the thumb so I can rub my throwing hand on it for a better grip on the ball for throws.
Advertisements